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ginkgo

[ging-koh, jing-] /ˈgɪŋ koʊ, ˈdʒɪŋ-/
noun, plural ginkgoes.
1.
a large shade tree, Ginkgo biloba, native to China, having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy seeds with edible kernels: the sole surviving species of the gymnosperm family Ginkgoaceae, which thrived in the Jurassic Period, and existing almost exclusively in cultivation.
Also, gingko.
Also called maidenhair-tree.
Origin
1765-1775
1765-75; < NL representation of Japanese ginkyō, equivalent to gin silver (< Chinese) + kyō apricot (< Chin)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ginkgo
  • ginkgo is intended as a blood thinner and as an aid to circulation within the brain.
  • The park is open year-round, but locals prefer the fall, when ginkgo trees change colors and illuminate the landscape.
  • Several species, including the dawn redwood and the maidenhair tree-also called ginkgo-are as old as the dinosaurs.
  • Then, bring the pot back to a boil, and add the ginkgo and pine nuts and boil for five minutes.
  • We bought fried octopus and roasted ginkgo nuts on the street.
  • And every fall, the giant ginkgo tree she planted near the church's entrance turns a brilliant butterscotch yellow.
  • Hence the appeal of alternative medicine: aromatherapy, homeopathy, ginkgo.
British Dictionary definitions for ginkgo

ginkgo

/ˈɡɪŋkɡəʊ/
noun (pl) -goes, -koes
1.
a widely planted ornamental Chinese gymnosperm tree, Ginkgo biloba, with fan-shaped deciduous leaves and fleshy yellow fruit: phylum Ginkgophyta. It is used in herbal remedies and as a food supplement Also called maidenhair tree
Word Origin
C18: from Japanese ginkyō, from Ancient Chinese yin silver + hang apricot
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ginkgo
n.

1773, from Japanese ginkyo, from Chinese yin-hing, from yin "silver" + hing "apricot" (Sino-Japanese kyo). Introduced to New World 1784 by William Hamilton in his garden near Philadelphia.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ginkgo in Science
ginkgo also gingko
  (gĭng'kō)   
A deciduous, dioecious tree (Ginkgo biloba) which is the sole surviving member of the Ginkgoales, an order of gymnosperms that was extremely widespread in the Mesozoic era. It belongs to a genus which has changed very little since the end of the Jurassic period. The tree, a native of China, has fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellowish seeds containing a edible kernel. Ginkgoes are often grown as ornamental street trees.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Word Value for ginkgo

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