glacial

[gley-shuhl]
adjective
1.
of or pertaining to glaciers or ice sheets.
2.
resulting from or associated with the action of ice or glaciers: glacial terrain.
3.
characterized by the presence of ice in extensive masses or glaciers.
4.
bitterly cold; icy: a glacial winter wind.
5.
happening or moving extremely slowly: The work proceeded at a glacial pace.
6.
icily unsympathetic or immovable: a glacial stare; glacial indifference.
7.
Chemistry. of, pertaining to, or tending to develop into icelike crystals: glacial phosphoric acid.

Origin:
1650–60; < Latin glaciālis icy, equivalent to glaci(ēs) ice + -ālis -al1

glacially, adverb
nonglacial, adjective
nonglacially, adverb
unglacial, adjective
unglacially, adverb


4. chill, freezing, frigid, wintry. 6. forbidding, unfriendly, hostile.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
glacial (ˈɡleɪsɪəl, -ʃəl)
 
adj
1.  characterized by the presence of masses of ice
2.  relating to, caused by, or deposited by a glacier
3.  extremely cold; icy
4.  cold or hostile in manner: a glacial look
5.  (of a chemical compound) of or tending to form crystals that resemble ice: glacial acetic acid
6.  very slow in progress: a glacial pace
 
'glacially
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

glacial
1656, from Fr. glacial, from L. glacialis "icy, frozen, full of ice," from glacies "ice," from PIE base *gel- "cold" (cf. L. gelu "frost"). Geological sense apparently coined by Professor E. Forbes, 1846.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
glacial   (glā'shəl)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. Relating to or derived from a glacier.

  2. Characterized or dominated by the existence of glaciers, as the Pleistocene Epoch.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
The temperature of the world fluctuated widely, and there were long periods of
  glacial cold.
Now my heart seems to be racing in my head, but my blood is glacial, cold and
  slow.
Then he had entered gaily the door of the glacial epoch, and had surveyed a
  universe of unities and uniformities.
Even with that, his solitude was glacial, and reacted on his character.
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