glanders

[glan-derz]
noun (used with a singular verb) Veterinary Pathology.
a contagious disease chiefly of horses and mules but communicable to humans, caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas mallei and characterized by swellings beneath the jaw and a profuse mucous discharge from the nostrils.
Compare farcy.


Origin:
1475–85; < Middle French glandres swollen glands < Latin glandulae swollen glands, literally, little acorns. See gland1, -ule

glanderous, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
glanders (ˈɡlændəz)
 
n
(functioning as singular) a highly infectious bacterial disease of horses, sometimes transmitted to man, caused by Actinobacillus mallei and characterized by inflammation and ulceration of the mucous membranes of the air passages, skin, and lymph glands
 
[C16: from Old French glandres enlarged glands, from Latin glandulae, literally: little acorns, from glāns acorn; see gland1]
 
'glandered
 
adj
 
'glanderous
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

glanders
"horse disease characterized by glandular swelling," c.1410, from O.Fr. glandres, pl. of glandre, from L. glandula (see gland).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

glanders

specific infectious and contagious disease of solipeds (the horse, ass, and mule); secondarily, humans may become infected through contact with diseased animals or by inoculation while handling diseased tissues and making laboratory cultures of the causal bacillus. In 1882 the bacteriologists Friedrich Loffler and Wilhelm Schutz in Germany isolated and identified the causal agent, which they named the Bacillus mallei, now designated technically as the Pfeifferella mallei or Malleomyces mallei. After infection, the disease usually follows a chronic course with a variable period of incubation extending from several weeks to several months.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Glanders is transmitted to humans by direct contact with infected animals.
The symptoms of melioidosis are similar to glanders and will depend upon the location where bacteria entered the body.
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