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gloat

[gloht] /gloʊt/
verb (used without object)
1.
to look at or think about with great or excessive, often smug or malicious, satisfaction:
The opposing team gloated over our bad luck.
noun
2.
an act or feeling of gloating.
Origin
1565-1575
1565-75; perhaps akin to Old Norse glotta to smile scornfully; compare German glotzen to stare
Related forms
gloater, noun
gloatingly, adverb
ungloating, adjective
Synonyms
1. See glare1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for gloat
  • Re-energised authoritarian regimes gloat over the so-called wisdom of repressive laws and acts.
  • Not with the aim of eventually able to gloat on a big head, but more humbled by the step about how much there is to know.
  • He declines to gloat when his team emerges fresh and potent in the playoffs.
  • But even if the former decides not to stand, the latter has little to gloat about.
  • However straightforward its news articles, its headlines and columnists tend to goad, gloat and cheer.
  • There were no rows of little lights to blink exuberance, no rich beery voice to gloat.
  • The candidates seemed neck and neck and not inclined to gloat.
  • It is never good policy to gloat on another country's misfortunes.
  • He doesn't gloat or count enemies but moves to the next task.
  • The first right-winger to gloat should get booted right out of the tent.
British Dictionary definitions for gloat

gloat

/ɡləʊt/
verb
1.
(intransitive) often foll by over. to dwell (on) with malevolent smugness or exultation
noun
2.
the act of gloating
Derived Forms
gloater, noun
gloatingly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse glotta to grin, Middle High German glotzen to stare
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gloat
v.

1570s, "to look at furtively," from a Scandinavian source, cf. Old Norse glotta "to grin, smile scornfully, show the teeth," Swedish dialectal glotta "to peep;" or from Middle High German glotzen "to stare, gape." Sense of "to look at with malicious satisfaction" first recorded 1748. Related: Gloated; gloating. As a noun, from 1640s with sense of "side-glance;" 1899 as "act of gloating."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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