glumness

glum

[gluhm]
adjective, glummer, glummest.
sullenly or silently gloomy; dejected.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English; variant of gloom

glumly, adverb
glumness, noun


moody, sulky; despondent, melancholy. Glum, morose, sullen, dour, surly all are adjectives describing a gloomy, unsociable attitude. Glum describes a depressed, spiritless condition or manner, usually temporary rather than habitual: a glum shrug of the shoulders; a glum, hopeless look in his eye. Morose which adds to glum a sense of bitterness, implies a habitual and pervasive gloominess: a sour, morose manner; morose withdrawal from human contact. Sullen usually implies reluctance or refusal to speak accompanied by glowering looks expressing anger or a sense of injury: a sullen manner, silence, look. Dour refers to a stern and forbidding aspect, stony and unresponsive: dour rejection of friendly overtures. Surly implies gruffness of speech and manner, usually accompanied by an air of injury and ill temper: a surly reply.
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World English Dictionary
glum (ɡlʌm)
 
adj , glummer, glummest
silent or sullen, as from gloom
 
[C16: variant of gloom]
 
'glumly
 
adv
 
'glumness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

glum
1540s, from M.E. gloumen (v.) "become dark" (c.1300), later gloumben "look gloomy or sullen" (late 14c.); see gloom.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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