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glutathione

[gloo-tuh-thahy-ohn] /ˌglu təˈθaɪ oʊn/
noun, Biochemistry
1.
a crystalline, water-soluble peptide of glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine, C 10 H 17 N 3 O 6 S, found in blood and in animal and plant tissues, and important in tissue oxidations and in the activation of some enzymes.
Origin
1920-1925
1920-25; gluta(mic acid) + thi- + -one
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for glutathione
  • glutathione occurs in high levels in the eye and helps clean up these free radicals.
  • Without glutathione, the body's ability to detoxify itself is greatly impaired, leading to oxidative stress.
  • glutathione is critically important to both bowel and lung function.
British Dictionary definitions for glutathione

glutathione

/ˌɡluːtəˈθaɪəʊn; -θaɪˈəʊn/
noun
1.
(biochem) a tripeptide consisting of glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine: important in biological oxidations and the activation of some enzymes. Formula: C10H17N3O6S
Word Origin
C20: from gluta(mic acid) + thi- + -one
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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glutathione in Medicine

glutathione glu·ta·thi·one (glōō'tə-thī'ōn')
n.
A tripeptide of the amino acids glycine, cystine, and glutamic acid occurring widely in plant and animal tissues and forming reduced and oxidized forms important in biological oxidation-reduction reactions.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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glutathione in Science
glutathione
  (gl'tə-thī'ōn')   
A polypeptide consisting of glycine, cysteine, and glutamic acid that occurs widely in plant and animal tissues. It is important in cellular respiration in both plants and animals, and serves as a cofactor for many enzymes. It is a major protective mechanism against oxidative stress. For example, it protects red blood cells from hydrogen peroxide, a toxic byproduct of certain metabolic reactions.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for glutathione

a tripeptide (i.e., compound composed of three amino acids), the chemical name of which is gamma-l-glutamyl-l-cysteinylglycine. Widely distributed in nature, it has been isolated from yeast, muscle, and liver. Glutathione has a role in the respiration of both mammalian and plant tissues and protects red blood cells against hydrogen peroxide, which is a toxic by-product of many metabolic reactions, by reducing the peroxide to water. It serves as a cofactor for various enzymes; e.g., glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, to which it becomes firmly bound.

Learn more about glutathione with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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