gold

[gohld]
noun
1.
a precious yellow metallic element, highly malleable and ductile, and not subject to oxidation or corrosion. Symbol: Au; atomic weight: 196.967; atomic number: 79; specific gravity: 19.3 at 20°C.
2.
a quantity of gold coins: to pay in gold.
3.
a monetary standard based on this metal; gold standard.
4.
money; wealth; riches.
5.
something likened to this metal in brightness, preciousness, superiority, etc.: a heart of gold.
6.
a bright, metallic yellow color, sometimes tending toward brown.
8.
(initial capital letter) Military. the code name for one of the five D-day invasion beaches, assaulted by British troops.
adjective
9.
consisting of gold.
10.
pertaining to gold.
11.
like gold.
12.
of the color of gold.
13.
indicating the fiftieth event of a series, as a wedding anniversary. See table under wedding anniversary.
14.
(of a record, CD, or cassette) having sold a minimum of 500,000 copies.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English, Old English; cognate with German Gold, Gothic gulth

nongold, noun, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Gold

[gohld, gawld]
noun

Gold

[gohld]
noun
1.
Herbert, born 1924, U.S. novelist and short-story writer.
2.
Thomas, 1920–2004, U.S. astronomer, born in Austria: formulated the steady-state theory of the universe.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
gold (ɡəʊld)
 
n
1.  a.  a dense inert bright yellow element that is the most malleable and ductile metal, occurring in rocks and alluvial deposits: used as a monetary standard and in jewellery, dentistry, and plating. The radioisotope gold-198 (radiogold), with a half-life of 2.69 days, is used in radiotherapy. Symbol: Au; atomic no: 79; atomic wt: 196.96654; valency: 1 or 3; relative density: 19.3; melting pt: 1064.43°C; boiling pt: 2857°CRelated: aurous, auric
 b.  (as modifier): a gold mine
2.  a coin or coins made of this metal
3.  money; wealth
4.  something precious, beautiful, etc, such as a noble nature (esp in the phrase heart of gold)
5.  a.  a deep yellow colour, sometimes with a brownish tinge
 b.  (as adjective): a gold carpet
6.  archery the bull's eye of a target, scoring nine points
7.  short for gold medal
 
Related: aurous, auric
 
[Old English gold; related to Old Norse gull, Gothic gulth, Old High German gold]

Gold (ɡəʊld)
 
n
Thomas. 1920--2004, Austrian-born astronomer, working in England and the US: with Bondi and Hoyle he proposed the steady-state theory of the universe

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gold
O.E. gold, from P.Gmc. *gulth- (cf. O.S., O.Fris., O.H.G. gold, Ger. Gold, M.Du. gout, Du. goud, O.N. gull, Dan. guld, Goth. gulþ), from PIE base *ghel-/*ghol- "yellow, green," possibly ult. "bright" (cf. O.C.S. zlato, Rus. zoloto, Skt. hiranyam, O.Pers. daraniya-, Avestan zaranya- "gold;" see
Chloe). In reference to the color of the metal, it is recorded from c.1400. Golden replaced M.E. gilden, from O.E. gyldan. Gold is one of the few Mod.Eng. nouns that form adjs. meaning "made of ______" by adding -en (e.g. wooden, leaden, waxen, olden); O.E. also had silfren "made of silver," stænen "made of stone." Goldenrod is 1568; goldfinch is from O.E. goldfinc; goldfish is from 1698, introduced into England from China, where they are native. Gold-digger "woman who pursues men for their money," first recorded 1915. Goldbrick (n.) "shirker" (1914) is World War I armed forces slang, from earlier verb meaning "to swindle, cheat" (1902) from the old con game of selling spurious "gold" bricks. Golden mean "avoidance of excess" translates L. aurea mediocritas (Horace). Golden rule (originally Golden law) so called from 1674.
"Do not do unto others as you would that they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same." [George Bernard Shaw, 1898]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

gold (gōld)
n.
Symbol Au
A soft yellow element that resists corrosion and is the most malleable and ductile metal. A good thermal and electrical conductor, gold is generally alloyed to increase its strength. Atomic number 79; atomic weight 196.967; melting point 1,064.2°C; boiling point 2,856°C; specific gravity 19.3; valence 1, 3.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
gold   (gōld)  Pronunciation Key 
Symbol Au
A soft, shiny, yellow element that is the most malleable of all the metals. It occurs in veins and in alluvial deposits. Because it is very durable, resistant to corrosion, and a good conductor of heat and electricity, gold is used as a plated coating on electrical and mechanical components. It is also an international monetary standard and is used in jewelry and for decoration. Atomic number 79; atomic weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See Periodic Table. See Note at element.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang Dictionary

gold definition


  1. n.
    money. (See also ducats.) : Do you have enough gold to pay the bill?
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Gold definition


(1.) Heb. zahab, so called from its yellow colour (Ex. 25:11; 1 Chr. 28:18; 2 Chr. 3:5). (2.) Heb. segor, from its compactness, or as being enclosed or treasured up; thus precious or "fine gold" (1 Kings 6:20; 7:49). (3.) Heb. paz, native or pure gold (Job 28:17; Ps. 19:10; 21:3, etc.). (4.) Heb. betzer, "ore of gold or silver" as dug out of the mine (Job 36:19, where it means simply riches). (5.) Heb. kethem, i.e., something concealed or separated (Job 28:16,19; Ps. 45:9; Prov. 25:12). Rendered "golden wedge" in Isa. 13:12. (6.) Heb. haruts, i.e., dug out; poetic for gold (Prov. 8:10; 16:16; Zech. 9:3). Gold was known from the earliest times (Gen. 2:11). It was principally used for ornaments (Gen. 24:22). It was very abundant (1 Chr. 22:14; Nah. 2:9; Dan. 3:1). Many tons of it were used in connection with the temple (2 Chr. 1:15). It was found in Arabia, Sheba, and Ophir (1 Kings 9:28; 10:1; Job 28:16), but not in Palestine. In Dan. 2:38, the Babylonian Empire is spoken of as a "head of gold" because of its great riches; and Babylon was called by Isaiah (14:4) the "golden city" (R.V. marg., "exactress," adopting the reading _marhebah_, instead of the usual word _madhebah_).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences for gold
Several members have achieved and have been awarded with their gold duke of
  edinburgh.
The interiors are densely saturated with elaborate gold leaf ornamentation.
Ring of the fisherman, a gold ring decorated with a depiction of st.
All colors are natural, with blue and gold borders around the patch.
Images for gold
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