gown

[goun]
noun
1.
a woman's dress or robe, especially one that is full-length.
5.
a loose, flowing outer garment in any of various forms, worn by a man or woman as distinctive of office, profession, or status: an academic gown.
6.
the student and teaching body in a university or college town.
verb (used with object)
7.
to dress in a gown.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English goune < Old French < Late Latin gunna fur or leather garment

ungowned, adjective


1. frock. See dress.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
gown (ɡaʊn)
 
n
1.  any of various outer garments, such as a woman's elegant or formal dress, a dressing robe, or a protective garment, esp one worn by surgeons during operations
2.  a loose wide garment indicating status, such as worn by academics
3.  Compare town the members of a university as opposed to the other residents of the university town
 
vb
4.  (tr) to supply with or dress in a gown
 
[C14: from Old French goune, from Late Latin gunna garment made of leather or fur, of Celtic origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gown
c.1300, from O.Fr. goune, from L.L. gunna "leather garment, skin, hide," of unknown origin. Used by St. Boniface (8c.) for a fur garment permitted for old or infirm monks. Klein writes it is probably "a word adopted from a language of the Apennine or the Balkan Peninsula." OED points to Byzantine Gk.
gouna, a word for a coarse garment sometimes made of skins. In 18c., gown was the common word for what is now usually styled a dress. It was maintained more in Amer.Eng. than in Britain, but was somewhat revived 20c. in fashion senses and in comb. forms (e.g. bridal gown, nightgown). Meaning "flowing robe worn as a badge of office or authority" is from late 14c., on image of the Roman toga. As collective singular for "residents of a university" (1650s) it is now usually opposed to town.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

gown (goun)
n.
A robe or smock worn in operating rooms and other parts of hospitals as a guard against contamination.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

gown

see cap and gown; town and gown.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
The real challenge, she said, is getting administrators to think differently about land use and town-gown relationships.
She spread the white satin gown on the art-room floor.
He's in a dressing gown, which he removes, slinging it behind his back to his
  butler.
She's given a case number, a bracelet, a hospital gown.
Idioms & Phrases
Images for gown
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