grampus

grampus

[gram-puhs]
noun, plural grampuses.
1.
a cetacean, Grampus griseus, of the dolphin family, widely distributed in northern seas.
2.
any of various related cetaceans, as the killer whale, Orcinus (Orca ) orca.
3.
a giant whip scorpion common to Florida.

Origin:
1520–30; earlier grampoys, variant (by assimilation) of graundepose great fish, equivalent to graunde grand + pose, poys < Middle French pois, peis < Latin pisce- (stem of piscis) fish; replacing Middle English gra(s)peis < Middle FrenchLatin crassus piscis fat fish

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World English Dictionary
grampus (ˈɡræmpəs)
 
n , pl -puses
1.  a widely distributed slaty-grey dolphin, Grampus griseus, with a blunt snout
2.  another name for killer whale
 
[C16: from Old French graspois, from gras fat (from Latin crassus) + pois fish (from Latin piscis)]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

grampus
1529, from Anglo-Fr. grampais, altered (by infl. of grand) from O.Fr. graspeis, from M.L. craspicis, lit. "fat fish," from L. crassus "thick" + piscis "fish."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

grampus

a common offshore inhabitant of tropical and temperate ocean waters, a member of the dolphin family (Delphinidae). The grampus measures about 4 metres (approximately 13 feet) in length and has a blunt head and a distinct longitudinal forehead crease. It is unique among dolphins in usually having no upper teeth and from zero to seven teeth in the lower jaw. Older males are heavily scarred about the head and trunk, apparently owing to encounters with other grampuses.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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