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groove

[groov] /gruv/
noun
1.
a long, narrow cut or indentation in a surface, as the cut in a board to receive the tongue of another board (tongue-and-groove joint) a furrow, or a natural indentation on an organism.
2.
the track or channel of a phonograph record for the needle or stylus.
3.
a fixed routine:
to get into a groove.
4.
Printing. the furrow at the bottom of a piece of type.
5.
Slang. an enjoyable time or experience.
verb (used with object), grooved, grooving.
6.
to cut a groove in; furrow.
7.
Slang.
  1. to appreciate and enjoy.
  2. to please immensely.
verb (used without object), grooved, grooving.
8.
Slang.
  1. to take great pleasure; enjoy oneself:
    He was grooving on the music.
  2. to get along or interact well.
9.
to fix in a groove.
Idioms
10.
in the groove, Slang.
  1. in perfect functioning order.
  2. in the popular fashion; up-to-date:
    If you want to be in the groove this summer, you'll need a bikini.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English grofe, groof mining shaft; cognate with Middle Dutch groeve, Dutch groef, German Grube pit, ditch; akin to grave1
Related forms
grooveless, adjective
groovelike, adjective
groover, noun
regroove, verb (used with object), regrooved, regrooving.
Synonyms
3. rut, habit, pattern.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for groove
  • Turns out that the venom's viscosity keeps it nestled in the groove.
  • For all their individual talents, the musicians had trouble finding a groove.
  • Monkeys don't care much for human music, but apparently they will groove to their own beat.
  • They ask us probing questions, forcing us out of the groove of our memorized speeches.
  • The fossil bat had a similar groove in its elbow as its modern counterpart.
  • Lasers cut a wake through plasma, then inject the light-speed groove with electrons.
  • The track also features a central groove left by the water scorpion's dragging tail, leaving indications of jerky movements.
  • The nerve rests in a groove called the cubital tunnel tucked behind the bony point on the elbow.
  • The first numeral in the correct number will begin with an inkless groove of oil and develop into a solid line.
  • And since muscle contraction velocity increases as sinews warm up, you can get into a groove right from the start of your workout.
British Dictionary definitions for groove

groove

/ɡruːv/
noun
1.
a long narrow channel or furrow, esp one cut into wood by a tool
2.
the spiral channel, usually V-shaped, in a gramophone record See also microgroove
3.
one of the spiral cuts in the bore of a gun
4.
(anatomy) any furrow or channel on a bodily structure or part; sulcus
5.
(mountaineering) a shallow fissure in a rock face or between two rock faces, forming an angle of more than 120°
6.
a settled existence, routine, etc, to which one is suited or accustomed, esp one from which it is difficult to escape
7.
(slang) an experience, event, etc, that is groovy
8.
in the groove
  1. (jazz) playing well and apparently effortlessly, with a good beat, etc
  2. (US) fashionable
verb
9.
(transitive) to form or cut a groove in
10.
(intransitive) (old-fashioned, slang) to enjoy oneself or feel in rapport with one's surroundings
11.
(intransitive) (jazz) to play well, with a good beat, etc
Derived Forms
grooveless, adjective
groovelike, adjective
Word Origin
C15: from obsolete Dutch groeve, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German gruoba pit, Old Norse grof
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for groove
n.

c.1400, "cave, mine, pit" (late 13c. in place names), from a Scandinavian source, cf. Old Norse grod "pit," or from Middle Dutch groeve "furrow, ditch," both from Proto-Germanic *grobo (cf. Old Norse grof "brook, river bed," Old High German gruoba "ditch," Gothic groba "pit, cave," Old English græf "ditch"), related to grave (n.). Sense of "long, narrow channel or furrow" is 1650s. Meaning "spiral cut in a phonograph record" is from 1902. Figurative sense of "routine" is from 1842, often deprecatory at first, "a rut."

v.

1680s, "make a groove," from groove (n.). Slang sense is from late 1930s. Related: Grooved; grooving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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groove in Medicine

groove (grōōv)
n.
A rut, groove, or narrow depression or channel in a surface.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Slang definitions & phrases for groove

groove

noun

Any habitually preferred activity; what excites and gratifies one; bag, kick (1958+)

verb
  1. To enjoy intensely; take gratification, esp rather passively and subjectively; go with the flow: To groove means to yield yourself to the flow of activity around you/ I just like to get out there and groove a little (1960s+)
  2. To like and approve; dig: They see the spade cats going with ofay chicks and they don't groove it (1960s+)
  3. o perform very well; be effective: really grooving on that funny trumpet (1935+)
Related Terms

in the groove

[fr the sense that a musician is in a definite and exciting track, has hit a perfect stride, when playing well, esp a solo; perhaps influenced by the grooves of a phonograph record]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with groove
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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