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gurgle

[gur-guh l] /ˈgɜr gəl/
verb (used without object), gurgled, gurgling.
1.
to flow in a broken, irregular, noisy current:
The water gurgled from the bottle.
2.
to make a sound as of water doing this (often used of birds or of human beings).
verb (used with object), gurgled, gurgling.
3.
to utter or express with a gurgling sound:
The baby gurgled its delight.
noun
4.
the act or noise of gurgling.
Origin of gurgle
1555-1565
1555-65; compare Dutch, Middle Low German gorgelen, German gurgeln to gargle; akin to Latin gurguliō throat
Related forms
gurglingly, adverb
Synonyms
1, 2. bubble, burble, babble.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for gurgle
Historical Examples
  • The music from Washington's harmonica ceased suddenly in the midst of a lofty flight, ending in a gurgle and a gasp.

  • The yell died away to a gurgle, pinched short by the Winslow fingers.

    Shavings Joseph C. Lincoln
  • Oh, she'll understand if y' kind o' chuckle an' gurgle like a fam'ly man.

  • It was only to lick his thick lips and gurgle 233 noisily in his fat throat.

    Once to Every Man Larry Evans
  • And they all took to holding water in their mouths that they might gurgle whenever anyone spoke to them.

    The Yellow Fairy Book Leonora Blanche Alleyne Lang
  • It ended suddenly on its highest note with a choke and a gurgle.

    The Return of Sherlock Holmes Arthur Conan Doyle
  • There was a clink of forks and plates, the gurgle of beer from bottles, the hum of talk, and the smell of many good things to eat.

  • He pronounces it as if the g were the hard kind that starts off gurgle.

    Wappin' Wharf Charles S. Brooks
  • The black liquor fell with a gurgle and splash into cracked glasses.

    Menotah Ernest G. Henham
  • The eternal laughter of youth quenched in a gurgle of the throat.

    The Rough Road William John Locke
British Dictionary definitions for gurgle

gurgle

/ˈɡɜːɡəl/
verb (intransitive)
1.
(of liquids, esp of rivers, streams, etc) to make low bubbling noises when flowing
2.
to utter low throaty bubbling noises, esp as a sign of contentment: the baby gurgled with delight
noun
3.
the act or sound of gurgling
Derived Forms
gurgling, adjective
Word Origin
C16: perhaps from Vulgar Latin gurgulāre, from Latin gurguliō gullet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gurgle
v.

early 15c., medical term for "gurgling heard in the abdomen," a native, echoic formation, or ultimately from Latin gurguliare, perhaps via Dutch, German gurgeln. Extended (non-anatomical) use, in reference to water over stones, etc., is first recorded 1713. "This phenomenon of long specialized use before becoming a part of the general vocabulary is often found in English" [Barnhart]. Related: Gurgled; gurgling. As a noun from early 15c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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