gust

1 [guhst]
noun
1.
a sudden, strong blast of wind.
2.
a sudden rush or burst of water, fire, smoke, sound, etc.
3.
an outburst of passionate feeling.
verb (used without object)
4.
to blow or rush in gusts.

Origin:
1580–90; < Old Norse gustr a gust, akin to gjōsa, gusa to gust

gustless, adjective


1. See wind1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

gust

2 [guhst]
noun
1.
Archaic. flavor or taste.
2.
Obsolete. enjoyment or gratification.
verb (used with object)
3.
Scot. to taste; savor.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Latin gustus a tasting (of food), eating a little, akin to gustāre to taste

gustable, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
gust (ɡʌst)
 
n
1.  a sudden blast of wind
2.  a sudden rush of smoke, sound, etc
3.  an outburst of emotion
 
vb
4.  to blow in gusts: the wind was gusting to more than 50 mph
 
[C16: from Old Norse gustr; related to gjōsa to gush; see geyser]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gust
1588, possibly a dial. survival from O.N. gustr "a cold blast of wind," or O.H.G. gussa "flood," both from P.Gmc. *gustiz, from PIE *gheus-, from root *gheu- "to pour." Probably originally in Eng. as a nautical term.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

gust

in meteorology, a sudden increase in wind speed above the average wind speed. It is briefer than a squall and usually lasts 20 seconds or less. Air turbulence around an obstacle causes gusts; they occur frequently over buildings and irregular ground and are less frequent over water. The term gust also denotes a sudden change in wind speed relative to a flying aircraft.

Learn more about gust with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
But this power source can be a bit fickle: today it might gust, while tomorrow could bring barely a breeze.
Caught in a gust of wind, a cloud of gray ash eddied through the car.
Two days before the sky show, a gust of solar wind had blasted off from the sun.
The devices pumped constant streams of air into their noses so a gust of odor
  would not wake them.
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