follow Dictionary.com

Denotation vs. Connotation

hallelujah

or halleluiah

[hal-uh-loo-yuh] /ˌhæl əˈlu yə/
interjection
1.
Praise ye the Lord!
noun
2.
an exclamation of “hallelujah!”.
3.
a shout of joy, praise, or gratitude.
4.
a musical composition wholly or principally based upon the word “hallelujah.”.
Origin of hallelujah
1525-1535
1525-35; < Hebrew halălūyāh praise ye Yahweh; cf. alleluia
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for hallelujah
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Up to that moment I didn't know that Mr. hallelujah used the common tooth of commerce.

    Remarks Bill Nye
  • So swift had this change been that the bondwomen had not seen it, and they were shouting "hallelujah!"

    The Scapegoat Hall Caine
  • The most resolutely impenitent sinner can shout "hallelujah," and "Woe is me," as loudly as any saint.

  • Mr. Winslow's hallelujah chorus stopped in the middle and he turned.

    Shavings Joseph C. Lincoln
  • Already in Athalia the “hallelujah” chorus at the end of the first act is a marvel of dramatic truth.

  • If you are a Presbyterian and your husband is a Methodist, when he shouts "hallelujah!"

    The Wedding Ring T. De Witt Talmage
British Dictionary definitions for hallelujah

hallelujah

/ˌhælɪˈluːjə/
interjection
1.
an exclamation of praise to God
2.
an expression of relief or a similar emotion
noun
3.
an exclamation of "Hallelujah"
4.
a musical composition that uses the word Hallelujah as its text
Word Origin
C16: from Hebrew hallelūyāh praise the Lord, from hellēl to praise + yāh the Lord, Yahweh
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for hallelujah

also halleluiah, 1530s, from Hebrew hallalu-yah "praise ye Jehovah," from hallalu, plural imperative of hallel "to praise" also "song of praise," from hillel "he praised," of imitative origin, with primary sense being "to trill." Second element is yah, shortened form of Yahweh, name of God. Replaced variant formation alleluia (12c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
hallelujah in the Bible

praise ye Jehovah, frequently rendered "Praise ye the LORD," stands at the beginning of ten of the psalms (106, 111-113, 135, 146-150), hence called "hallelujah psalms." From its frequent occurrence it grew into a formula of praise. The Greek form of the word (alleluia) is found in Rev. 19:1, 3, 4, 6.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for hallelujah

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for hallelujah

0
27
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for hallelujah