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Denotation vs. Connotation

hallow1

[hal-oh] /ˈhæl oʊ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to make holy; sanctify; consecrate.
2.
to honor as holy; consider sacred; venerate:
to hallow a battlefield.
Origin of hallow1
900
before 900; Middle English hal(o)wen, Old English hālgian (cognate with German heiligen, Old Norse helga), derivative of hālig holy
Related forms
hallower, noun

hallow2

[huh-loh] /həˈloʊ/
interjection, noun, verb (used without object), verb (used with object)
1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for hallow
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The name of God we hallow, but not as did the ancient Israelites, by refusing even to mention the sacredly incommunicable Yahweh.

    The Arena Various
  • She evidently has no classical associations to hallow her memory withal.'

    Jack Hinton Charles James Lever
  • An alloy is a mixture or medley, anything allowed is according to law, and hallow is the same word as holy.

    Archaic England Harold Bayley
  • The gentleman began to chat with her about hallow Eve and the rainy weather.

    Dubliners James Joyce
  • In order to hallow God's name, we must not only hear but obey His Word.

  • Perhaps he was thinking of his early days, and of the mother who had taught him to hallow them.

  • No, what you are feeling now is only the result of your beautiful nature, and the recollection of it will hallow all my life.

    Three Dramas Bjrnstjerne M. Bjrnson
  • When the hounds receive their reward after a hare-hunt he calls it the hallow.

    The Master of Game Second Duke of York, Edward
  • The earth is our workshop; we may not curse it, we must hallow it.

    The Life of Mazzini Bolton King
British Dictionary definitions for hallow

hallow

/ˈhæləʊ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to consecrate or set apart as being holy
2.
to venerate as being holy
Derived Forms
hallower, noun
Word Origin
Old English hālgian, from hāligholy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hallow
v.

Old English halgian "to make holy, to honor as holy, consecrate, ordain," related to halig "holy," from Proto-Germanic *hailaga- (cf. Old Saxon helagon, Middle Dutch heligen, Old Norse helga), from PIE root *kailo- "whole, uninjured, of good omen" (see health). Used in Christian translations to render Latin sanctificare. Also used since Old English as a noun meaning "holy person, saint." Related: Hallowed; hallowing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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hallow in the Bible

to render sacred, to consecrate (Ex. 28:38; 29:1). This word is from the Saxon, and properly means "to make holy." The name of God is "hallowed", i.e., is reverenced as holy (Matt. 6:9).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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