follow Dictionary.com

Why is the ninth month called September?

heartland

[hahrt-land, -luh nd] /ˈhɑrtˌlænd, -lənd/
noun
1.
the part of a region considered essential to the viability and survival of the whole, especially a central land area relatively invulnerable to attack and capable of economic and political self-sufficiency.
2.
any central area, as of a state, nation, or continent:
a vineyard in California's heartland.
Origin
1900-1905
1900-05; heart + land
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for heartland
  • The health of the heartland is vital to the country as a whole.
  • Here in the heartland, it is the heart of tornado season.
  • Instead it will emphasise the heartland values of family and practicality.
  • But if you want to settle down with a partner, the suburbs and the heartland beckon.
  • In the tech heartland, this is the ultimate compliment.
  • Most alarmingly for the president, his popularity is tottering even in his heartland.
British Dictionary definitions for heartland

heartland

/ˈhɑːtˌlænd/
noun
1.
the central region of a country or continent
2.
the core or most vital area the industrial heartland of England
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for heartland
n.

1904, first recorded in geo-political writings of English geographer H.J. MacKinder (1861-1947), from heart in figurative sense "center, core" + land (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Article for heartland

landlocked region of central Eurasia whose control was posited by Sir Halford J. Mackinder in the early 20th century as the key to world domination in an era of declining importance for traditionally invincible sea power. Mackinder observed that the majority of the world's population resided on the Eurasian and African landmass and that control of this "world island" would lead to eventual world domination. This world island could be best controlled from the pivot area, which would guarantee self-sufficiency in food for the country dominating the region, and the pivot area's inaccessibility by sea would provide a formidable defensive barrier. The pivot area was vulnerable to land attack only by way of the plains of eastern Europe. Thus, control of eastern Europe would ensure domination of the pivot area and ultimately world domination. Mackinder's landbased theory of world power contradicted the conventional maritime theory advocated by Alfred Thayer Mahan during the 19th century. In 1919 Mackinder renamed the concept the heartland.

Learn more about heartland with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for heartland

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for heartland

13
0
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with heartland

Nearby words for heartland