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[hen-dahy-uh-dis] /hɛnˈdaɪ ə dɪs/
noun, Rhetoric
a figure in which a complex idea is expressed by two words connected by a copulative conjunction: “to look with eyes and envy” instead of “with envious eyes.”.
Origin of hendiadys
1580-90; < Medieval Latin; alteration of Greek phrase hèn dià dyoîn one through two, one by means of two Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for hendiadys
Historical Examples
  • Real instances of hendiadys are much rarer than is generally supposed.

    Cato Maior de Senectute Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • A hendiadys for 'Go drink all the mind-purging hellebore that grows in Anticyra'.

  • This line is a type of hendiadys, the first half of the line being redefined by the second.

British Dictionary definitions for hendiadys


a rhetorical device by which two nouns joined by a conjunction, usually and, are used instead of a noun and a modifier, as in to run with fear and haste instead of to run with fearful haste
Word Origin
C16: from Medieval Latin, changed from Greek phrase hen dia duoin, literally: one through two
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hendiadys

1580s, figure of speech in which two nouns joined by and are used in place of a noun and an adjective; from Medieval Latin alteration of Greek hen dia duoin "one (thing) by means of two." If this term was used by Greek grammarians it is no longer found in their writings, but it is frequent among Latin writers.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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