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henry

[hen-ree] /ˈhɛn ri/
noun, plural henries, henrys. Electricity
1.
the standard unit of inductance in the International System of Units (SI), formally defined to be the inductance of a closed circuit in which an electromotive force of one volt is produced when the electric current in the circuit varies uniformly at a rate of one ampere per second.
Abbreviation: H.
Origin
1890-1895
1890-95; named after J. Henry

Henry

[hen-ree] /ˈhɛn ri/
noun
1.
Joseph, 1797–1878, U.S. physicist.
2.
O. pen name of William Sydney Porter.
3.
Patrick, 1736–99, American patriot, orator, and statesman.
4.
Cape, a cape in SE Virginia at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.
5.
Fort. Fort Henry.
6.
a male given name: from Germanic words meaning “home” and “kingdom.”.

Henry

[hen-ree] /ˈhɛn ri/
noun
1.
a .44 caliber lever-action repeating rifle, marketed in the U.S. in the early 1860s, using metallic cartridges and a tubular magazine capable of holding 16 rounds.
Origin
after Benjamin Tyler Henry (1821-98), U.S. inventor who designed it

Henry I

noun
1.
("Henry the Fowler") a.d. 876?–936, king of Germany 919–936: first of the Saxon kings.
2.
("Beauclerc") 1068–1135, king of England 1100–35 (son of William the Conqueror).
3.
1008–60, king of France 1031–60.

Henry II

noun
1.
("Henry the Saint") 973–1024, king of Germany 1002–24 and emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1014–24.
2.
("Curtmantle") 1133–89, king of England 1154–89: first king of the Plantagenet line (grandson of Henry I of England).
3.
1519–59, king of France 1547–59 (son of Francis I).

Henry III

noun
1.
1017–56, king of Germany 1039–56 and emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1046–56 (son of Conrad II).
2.
1207–72, king of England 1216–72 (son of John).
3.
1551–89, king of France 1574–89 (son of Henry II of France).

Henry IV

noun
1.
1050–1106, emperor of the Holy Roman Empire and king of Germany 1056–1106.
2.
(Bolingbroke"Henry of Lancaster") 1367–1413, king of England 1399–1413 (son of John of Gaunt).
3.
("Henry of Navarre"; "Henry the Great") 1553–1610, king of France 1589–1610: first of the French Bourbon kings.
4.
(italics) a two-part drama (Part 1, 1597?; Part 2, 1597–98?) by Shakespeare.

Henry V

noun
1.
1086–1125, king of Germany 1106–25 and emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1111–25 (son of Henry IV).
2.
1387–1422, king of England 1413–22 (son of Henry IV of Bolingbroke).
3.
(italics) a drama (1598–99) by Shakespeare.

Henry VI

noun
1.
1165–97, king of Germany 1190–97; king of Sicily 1194–97; emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1191–97 (son of Frederick I).
2.
1421–71, king of England 1422–61, 1470–71 (son of Henry V).
3.
(italics) a three-part drama (Part 1, 1591–92; Part 2, 1590?; Part 3, 1590?) by Shakespeare.

Henry VII

noun
1.
("Henry of Luxembourg") 1275?–1313, king of Germany 1309–13 and emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1312–13.
2.
(Henry Tudor) 1457–1509, king of England 1485–1509: first king of the house of Tudor.

Henry VIII

noun
1.
("Defender of the Faith") 1491–1547, king of England 1509–47 (son of Henry VII).
2.
(italics) a drama (1612–13?) by Shakespeare.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for henry
  • He was the son of king henry viii by his third wife, jane seymour.
  • henry was by no means faithful to his wife and had a reputation for philandering.
  • henry fathered other illegitimate children throughout the marriage.
  • Away from henry, eleanor was able to develop her own court in poitier.
  • henry, meanwhile, is disappointed that she is not as beautiful as her portrait.
  • henry tells him that if he ever looks on him again, it will be only on his head.
  • henry becomes frustrated by her constant want for debate, and angrily rejects her.
  • The contact with the theosophist henry more, revived his interest in alchemy.
  • henry decided to use the occasion as an excuse to expand his holdings in northern france.
  • henry wished to annul the marriage in order to marry another.
British Dictionary definitions for henry

henry

/ˈhɛnrɪ/
noun (pl) -ry, -ries, -rys
1.
the derived SI unit of electric inductance; the inductance of a closed circuit in which an emf of 1 volt is produced when the current varies uniformly at the rate of 1 ampere per second H
Word Origin
C19: named after Joseph Henry (1797–1878), US physicist

Henry

/ˈhɛnrɪ/
noun
1.
Joseph. 1797–1878, US physicist. He discovered the principle of electromagnetic induction independently of Faraday and constructed the first electromagnetic motor (1829). He also discovered self-induction and the oscillatory nature of electric discharges (1842)
2.
Patrick. 1736–99, American statesman and orator, a leading opponent of British rule during the War of American Independence
3.
Prince, known as Harry. born 1984, second son of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Diana, Princess of Wales

Henry I

noun
1.
known as Henry the Fowler. ?876–936 ad, duke of Saxony (912–36) and king of Germany (919–36): founder of the Saxon dynasty (918–1024)
2.
1068–1135, king of England (1100–35) and duke of Normandy (1106–35); son of William the Conqueror: crowned in the absence of his elder brother, Robert II, duke of Normandy; conquered Normandy (1106)

Henry II

noun
1.
known as Henry the Saint. 973–1024, king of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor (1014–24): canonized in 1145
2.
1133–89, first Plantagenet king of England (1154–89): extended his Anglo-French domains and instituted judicial and financial reforms. His attempts to control the church were opposed by Becket
3.
1519–59, king of France (1547–59); husband of Catherine de' Medici. He recovered Calais from the English (1558) and suppressed the Huguenots

Henry III

noun
1.
1017–56, king of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor (1046–56). He increased the power of the Empire but his religious policy led to rebellions
2.
1207–72, king of England (1216–72); son of John. His incompetent rule provoked the Barons' War (1264–67), during which he was captured by Simon de Montfort
3.
1551–89, king of France (1574–89). He plotted the massacre of Huguenots on St Bartholomew's Day (1572) with his mother Catherine de' Medici, thus exacerbating the religious wars in France

Henry IV

noun
1.
1050–1106, Holy Roman Emperor (1084–1105) and king of Germany (1056–1105). He was excommunicated by Pope Gregory VII, whom he deposed (1084)
2.
surnamed Bolingbroke. 1367–1413, first Lancastrian king of England (1399–1413); son of John of Gaunt: deposed Richard II (1399) and suppressed rebellions led by Owen Glendower and the Earl of Northumberland
3.
known as Henry of Navarre. 1553–1610, first Bourbon king of France (1589–1610). He obtained toleration for the Huguenots with the Edict of Nantes (1598) and restored prosperity to France following the religious wars (1562–98)

Henry V

noun
1.
1081–1125, king of Germany (1089–1125) and Holy Roman Emperor (1111–25)
2.
1387–1422, king of England (1413–22); son of Henry IV. He defeated the French at the Battle of Agincourt (1415), conquered Normandy (1419), and was recognized as heir to the French throne (1420)

Henry VI

noun
1.
1165–97, king of Germany (1169–97) and Holy Roman Emperor (1190–97): added Sicily to the Empire
2.
1421–71, last Lancastrian king of England (1422–61; 1470–71); son of Henry V. His weak rule was blamed for the loss by 1453 of all his possessions in France except Calais; from 1454 he suffered periods of insanity which contributed to the outbreak of the Wars of the Roses (1455–85). He was deposed by Edward IV (1461) but was briefly restored to the throne (1470)

Henry VII

noun
1.
?1275–1313, Holy Roman Emperor (1312–13) and, as Henry VI, count of Luxembourg (1288–1313). He became king of the Lombards in 1313
2.
1457–1509, first Tudor king of England (1485–1509). He came to the throne (1485) after defeating Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field, ending the Wars of the Roses. Royal power and the prosperity of the country greatly increased during his reign

Henry VIII

noun
1.
1491–1547, king of England (1509–47); second son of Henry VII. The declaration that his marriage to Catherine of Aragon was invalid and his marriage to Anne Boleyn (1533) precipitated the Act of Supremacy, making Henry supreme head of the Church in England. Anne Boleyn was executed (1536) and Henry subsequently married Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr. His reign is also noted for the fame of his succession of advisers, Cardinal Wolsey, Sir Thomas More, and Thomas Cromwell
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for henry

Henry

masc. proper name, from French Henri, from Late Latin Henricus, from German Heinrich, from Old High German Heimerich, literally "the ruler of the house," from heim "home" + rihhi "ruler." One of the most popular Norman names after the Conquest.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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henry in Medicine

henry hen·ry (hěn'rē)
n. pl. hen·rys or hen·ries (-rēz)
Abbr. H
The unit of inductance in which an induced electromotive force of one volt is produced when the current is varied at the rate of one ampere per second.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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henry in Science
henry
  (hěn'rē)   
A SI derived unit of electrical inductance, especially of transformers and inductance coils. A current changing at the rate of one ampere per second in a circuit with an inductance of one henry induces an electromotive force of one volt.
Henry, Joseph 1797-1878.  
American physicist who studied electromagnetic phenomena. He discovered electrical induction independently of Michael Faraday, and constructed a small electromagnetic motor in 1829. He also developed a system of weather forecasting based on meteorological observations. The henry unit of inductance is named for him.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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henry in Culture

Henry VIII definition


A king of England in the early sixteenth century. With the support of his Parliament, Henry established himself as head of the Christian Church in England, in place of the pope, after the pope refused to allow his marriage to Catherine of Aragon to be dissolved. Since that time, except for a few years of rule under Henry's daughter Mary I, who was a Roman Catholic, England has been officially a Protestant nation.

In his personal life, Henry was known for his corpulence and for his six wives. He divorced the first, Catherine of Aragon. He beheaded the second, Anne Boleyn, for allegedly being unfaithful to him. His third wife, Jane Seymour, died soon after giving birth to a son. He divorced his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves, and beheaded his fifth wife, Catherine Howard, also for alleged infidelity. His sixth wife, Catherine Parr, survived him. He also had his close friend and adviser Thomas More executed because More would not support Henry's declaration that he was head of the church in England. Henry was the father of King Edward VI and of Queen Elizabeth I, as well as Mary I.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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henry in Technology

unit
(H) The SI unit of inductance: one henry is the inductance of a closed loop in which the induced voltage is one volt if the current flowing through it changes by one ampere each second, i.e., 1 H = 1 Vs/A. Named after the American physicist Joseph Henry (1797-1878).
(1997-03-16)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Article for henry

unit of either self-inductance or mutual inductance, abbreviated h (or hy), and named for the American physicist Joseph Henry. One henry is the value of self-inductance in a closed circuit or coil in which one volt is produced by a variation of the inducing current of one ampere per second. One henry is also the value of the mutual inductance of two coils arranged such that an electromotive force of one volt is induced in one if the current in the other is changing at a rate of one ampere per second. See inductance.

Learn more about henry with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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