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high noon

the exact moment of noon.
the high point of a stage or period; peak; pinnacle:
a book written at the high noon of his career.
Informal. a crisis or confrontation.
Origin of high noon
1350-1400; Middle English Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for high-noon
Historical Examples
  • Not a soul was stirring, and yet it was high-noon—Wall Street?

    Darkwater W. E. B. Du Bois
  • There stood his sisters by the quern, For the high-noon cakes they needs must earn.

    Poems by the Way William Morris
  • Thorbiorn came there about high-noon; alone he was, and rode up to the outer door; the door was locked, and no men were abroad.

    The Story of Grettir The Strong Translated by Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris
  • It was now high-noon, and I had eaten nothing since dinner the night before.

    Dead Men Tell No Tales E. W. Hornung
  • If there had been, a fellow couldn't be advertising her to the crew of an oil-tanker at high-noon, could he?

    Wide Courses James Brendan Connolly
  • At high-noon they had reached what appeared to be a deserted castle, situated in the midst of a flowery oasis.

    The Hill of Venus Nathan Gallizier
  • high-noon came and passed, finding and leaving him in absorbed contemplation of his own thought.

  • A partly demented young man clamouring to see you at high-noon while the cold cruel cause of his lunacy looks on and laughs.

    The Streets of Ascalon Robert W. Chambers
  • It was high-noon, dreamy, entranced, all the world golden with the magnificent weather as a holly-hock is golden with pollen.

    The Brimming Cup Dorothy Canfield Fisher
  • It was high-noon when the ship once more issued into the broad bosom of the Pacific.

    Afloat And Ashore James Fenimore Cooper

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