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hinder1

[hin-der] /ˈhɪn dər/
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause delay, interruption, or difficulty in; hamper; impede:
The storm hindered our progress.
2.
to prevent from doing, acting, or happening; stop:
to hinder a man from committing a crime.
verb (used without object)
3.
to be an obstacle or impediment.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English hindren, Old English hindrian to hold back, equivalent to hinder hinder2 + -ian causative verb suffix
Related forms
hinderer, noun
hinderingly, adverb
unhindered, adjective
unhindering, adjective
unhinderingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. encumber, obstruct, trammel. 2. block, thwart. See prevent.
Antonyms
1. encourage.

hinder2

[hahyn-der] /ˈhaɪn dər/
adjective
1.
situated at the rear or back; posterior:
the hinder part of a carcass.
noun
2.
Chiefly Northern and North Midland U.S. the buttocks.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English; compare Old English hinder (adv.) behind; cognate with German hinter (preposition) behind
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for hinders
  • Both of these misconceptions are remnants of an outdated view that hinders families from getting the best diagnosis and best care.
  • The membrane hinders the flow of nutrients into the leaf which stops the leaf from making new chlorophyll.
  • They warn that spanking slows mental development and hinders achievement.
  • It hinders him when he tries to crawl, walk or grasping objects.
  • The movement is decentralized, and that hinders the type of coordination one needs to harness energies for political action.
British Dictionary definitions for hinders

hinder1

/ˈhɪndə/
verb
1.
to be or get in the way of (someone or something); hamper
2.
(transitive) to prevent
Derived Forms
hinderer, noun
hindering, adjective, noun
Word Origin
Old English hindrian; related to Old Norse hindra, Old High German hintarōn

hinder2

/ˈhaɪndə/
adjective
1.
(prenominal) situated at or further towards the back or rear; posterior: the hinder parts
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old Norse hindri latter, Gothic hindar beyond, Old High German hintar behind
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hinders

hinder

v.

Old English hindrian "to harm, injure, impair, check, repress," from Proto-Germanic *hinderojanan (cf. Old Norse hindra, Dutch hinderen, Old High German hintaron, German hindern "to keep back"), from a root meaning "on that side of, behind" (cf. hind (adj.)); thus the ground sense is "to put or keep back," though this sense in English is recorded only from late 14c. Related: Hindered; hindering.

adj,

"situated in the rear, toward the back," late 14c., probably from Old English hinder (adv.) "behind, back, afterward," but treated as a comparative of hind (adj.). Related to Old High German hintar, German hinter, Gothic hindar "behind." Middle English had hinderhede, literally "hinder-hood; posterity in time, inferiority in rank;" and hinderling "person fallen from moral or social respectability, wretch."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for hinders

hinders

n,n phr

The legs •Often in phrases connoting resistance or defiance: He stood up on his short little hinders and got himself a lawyer/ The Packer defense rose on its hind legs again (1940s+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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