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hinder1

[hin-der] /ˈhɪn dər/
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause delay, interruption, or difficulty in; hamper; impede:
The storm hindered our progress.
2.
to prevent from doing, acting, or happening; stop:
to hinder a man from committing a crime.
verb (used without object)
3.
to be an obstacle or impediment.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English hindren, Old English hindrian to hold back, equivalent to hinder hinder2 + -ian causative verb suffix
Related forms
hinderer, noun
hinderingly, adverb
unhindered, adjective
unhindering, adjective
unhinderingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. encumber, obstruct, trammel. 2. block, thwart. See prevent.
Antonyms
1. encourage.

hinder2

[hahyn-der] /ˈhaɪn dər/
adjective
1.
situated at the rear or back; posterior:
the hinder part of a carcass.
noun
2.
Chiefly Northern and North Midland U.S. the buttocks.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English; compare Old English hinder (adv.) behind; cognate with German hinter (preposition) behind
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for hinder
  • The last thing you want is for your colleague to hinder your own ability to meet deadlines.
  • There family roots in what was often viewed as a "crude" and undesirable culture did not hinder them.
  • This bacteria can be invasive and may hinder the recovery of the damaged reef.
  • It will hinder the efforts of all presidents henceforth.
  • He added that a lack of experience would not hinder his ability to fill in.
  • The weight didn't appear to hinder him professionally.
  • That has some administrators concerned that the measures could hinder their competitiveness as employers.
  • Infectious diseases hinder developing countries from developing.
  • He said the condition would not hinder his ability to do his job.
  • Have students individually list factors that would promote or hinder the spread of new strains of flu.
British Dictionary definitions for hinder

hinder1

/ˈhɪndə/
verb
1.
to be or get in the way of (someone or something); hamper
2.
(transitive) to prevent
Derived Forms
hinderer, noun
hindering, adjective, noun
Word Origin
Old English hindrian; related to Old Norse hindra, Old High German hintarōn

hinder2

/ˈhaɪndə/
adjective
1.
(prenominal) situated at or further towards the back or rear; posterior the hinder parts
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old Norse hindri latter, Gothic hindar beyond, Old High German hintar behind
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hinder
hinder
O.E. hindrian "to harm, injure, impair," from P.Gmc. *khinderojanan, from a root meaning "on that side of, behind" (cf. hind (adj.)); thus the ground sense is "to put or keep back." Cognate of O.N. hindra, Du. hinderen, Ger. hindern "to keep back."
hinder
"rear," O.E. hinder (adv.), possibly comparative of hind (adj.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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