humoresque

humoresque

[hyoo-muh-resk or, often, yoo-]
noun
a musical composition of humorous or capricious character.

Origin:
1875–80; humor + -esque, modeled on German Humoreske

humoresquely, adverb
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World English Dictionary
humoresque (ˌhjuːməˈrɛsk)
 
n
a short lively piece of music
 
[C19: from German Humoreske, ultimately from English humour]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

humoresque

a type of character piece, generally a short piano composition expressing a mood or a vague nonmusical idea, usually more good-humored than humorous. Robert Schumann, the first composer to use the term as a musical title, called his Opus 20 (1839) Humoreske (it is atypically like a long suite). His Opus 88, No. 2, is a humoresque for violin, cello, and piano. The best-known is Antonin Dvorak's Humoresque in G-flat, the seventh in his collection Eight Humoresques for piano (1894). Gustav Mahler originally called his Des Knaben Wunderhorn (1888-99; Songs From the Youth's Magic Horn) "Humoreske."

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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