follow Dictionary.com

11 Trending Words of 2014

hunky-dory

[huhng-kee-dawr-ee, -dohr-ee] /ˈhʌŋ kiˈdɔr i, -ˈdoʊr i/
adjective, Slang.
1.
about as well as one could wish or expect; satisfactory; fine; OK.
Origin
1865-1870
1865-70; hunky1 + dory < ?
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for hunky-dory
  • Things may not exactly be hunky-dory, but some of the innovations at bottom of the pyramid are certainly working.
  • It seems to be a brilliantly calculated move and look hunky-dory.
  • The newly hatched sibling seemed to think his older brother was hunky-dory, and they got on famously.
  • We haven't told you that everything is all fine and hunky-dory.
British Dictionary definitions for hunky-dory

hunky-dory

/ˌhʌŋkɪˈdɔːrɪ/
adjective
1.
(informal) very satisfactory; fine
Word Origin
C20: of uncertain origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for hunky-dory
adj.

1866, American English (popularized c.1870 by a Christy Minstrel song), perhaps a reduplication of hunkey "all right, satisfactory" (1861), from hunk "in a safe position" (1847) New York City slang, from Dutch honk "goal, home," from Middle Dutch honc "place of refuge, hiding place." A theory from 1876, however, traces it to Honcho dori, said to be a street in Yokohama, Japan, where sailors went for diversions of the sort sailors enjoy.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Slang definitions & phrases for hunky-dory

hunky-dory

adjective

Satisfactory; fine; copacetic: That may be hunky-dory with the jumping and jiving youngsters

[1866+; origin uncertain; hunky was a generalized term of approval by 1861; as to dory, according to one proposal of 1876 it was brought back by sailors from Yokohama, Japan, where Honcho dori is a street where they found their diversions; the term was popularized by a Christy Minstrels song of about 1870]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for hunky-dory

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for hunky

15
15
Scrabble Words With Friends