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[hur-ee, huhr-ee] /ˈhɜr i, ˈhʌr i/
verb (used without object), hurried, hurrying.
to move, proceed, or act with haste (often followed by up):
Hurry, or we'll be late. Hurry up, it's starting to rain.
verb (used with object), hurried, hurrying.
to drive, carry, or cause to move or perform with speed.
to hasten; urge forward (often followed by up).
to impel or perform with undue haste:
to hurry someone into a decision.
noun, plural hurries.
a state of urgency or eagerness:
to be in a hurry to meet a train.
hurried movement or action; haste.
Origin of hurry
1580-90; expressive word of uncertain origin, compare Middle English horyed (attested once) rushed, impelled, Middle High German hurren to move quickly
Related forms
hurryingly, adverb
overhurry, verb, overhurried, overhurrying.
unhurrying, adjective
unhurryingly, adverb
1. See rush1 . 2. hasten. 3. accelerate, quicken; expedite, hustle. 6. celerity; expedition, dispatch; speed, quickness; bustle, ado.
3. delay, slow. 6. deliberation. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for hurry
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It is a great work, and not by any means one to be read in a hurry.

  • We made fast to the levee, and as we were in no hurry, I did not call any of the passengers.

    Up the River Oliver Optic
  • They seemed in no hurry, nor did they make any apparent effort to conceal themselves.

    'Me-Smith' Caroline Lockhart
  • He had evidently dressed in a hurry, for his cravat was ill-tied and the collar gaped.

    Jack O' Judgment Edgar Wallace
  • Well, there's no hurry, of course; we can stay over indefinitely.

    Good References E. J. Rath
British Dictionary definitions for hurry


verb -ries, -rying, -ried
(intransitive) often foll by up. to hasten (to do something); rush
(transitive) often foll by along. to speed up the completion, progress, etc, of
urgency or eagerness
(informal) in a hurry
  1. easily: you won't beat him in a hurry
  2. willingly: we won't go there again in a hurry
Derived Forms
hurrying, noun, adjective
hurryingly, adverb
Word Origin
C16 horyen, probably of imitative origin; compare Middle High German hurren; see scurry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hurry

1590, first recorded in Shakespeare, who used it often; perhaps a variant of harry (v.), or perhaps a West Midlands sense of Middle English hurren "to vibrate rapidly, buzz," from Proto-Germanic *hurza "to move with haste" (cf. Middle High German hurren "to whir, move fast," Old Swedish hurra "to whirl round"), which also perhaps is the root of hurl. Related: hurried; hurrying.


c.1600, probably from hurry (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for hurry


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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