idiomatic

[id-ee-uh-mat-ik]
adjective
1.
peculiar to or characteristic of a particular language or dialect: idiomatic French.
2.
containing or using many idioms.
3.
having a distinct style or character, especially in the arts: idiomatic writing; an idiomatic composer.
Also, idiomatical.


Origin:
1705–15; < Late Greek idiōmatikós, equivalent to idiōmat- (stem of idíōma) idiom + -ikos -ic

idiomatically, adverb
idiomaticalness, idiomaticity [id-ee-oh-muh-tis-i-tee] , noun
nonidiomatic, adjective
nonidiomatical, adjective
nonidiomatically, adverb
nonidiomaticalness, noun
unidiomatic, adjective
unidiomatically, adverb
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World English Dictionary
idiom (ˈɪdɪəm)
 
n
1.  a group of words whose meaning cannot be predicted from the meanings of the constituent words, as for example (It was raining) cats and dogs
2.  linguistic usage that is grammatical and natural to native speakers of a language
3.  the characteristic vocabulary or usage of a specific human group or subject
4.  the characteristic artistic style of an individual, school, period, etc
 
[C16: from Latin idiōma peculiarity of language, from Greek; see idio-]
 
idiomatic
 
adj
 
idio'matical
 
adj
 
idio'matically
 
adv
 
idio'maticalness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
And a lot of composers simply don't write in an idiomatic fashion for the instrument.
But far harder to detect are cultural and idiomatic differences.
Focus on vocabulary or expressions that are unknown or idiomatic.
Idiomatic or usual form of speech, not meant to be offensive.
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