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ilk1

[ilk] /ɪlk/
noun
1.
family, class, or kind:
he and all his ilk.
adjective
2.
same.
Idioms
3.
of that ilk,
  1. (in Scotland) of the same family name or place:
    Ross of that ilk, i.e., Ross of Ross.
  2. of the same class or kind.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English ilke, Old English ilca (pronoun) the same, equivalent to demonstrative i (cognate with Gothic is he, Latin is that) + a reduced form of līc like1; cf. which, such

ilk2

[ilk] /ɪlk/
pronoun
1.
each.
adjective
2.
each; every.
Origin
before 900; Middle English ilk, north variant of ilch, Old English ylc (pronoun) each
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ilk
  • Hence the protests of yourself and others of your ilk on this thread.
  • In theater, their ilk has long been presented as the opposite of suburban conformity.
  • Extremists of any ilk are not interested in another opinion.
  • Viewers who worry that she and her ilk are pumping up hardship cases to gin up entertainment are adrift in wishful thinking.
  • Taking it all in all, this picture is better than the majority of its ilk.
  • Theories of this ilk are usually created to predict a phenomenon.
British Dictionary definitions for ilk

ilk1

/ɪlk/
noun
1.
a type; class; sort (esp in the phrase of that, his, her, etc, ilk): people of that ilk should not be allowed here
2.
(Scot) of that ilk, of the place of the same name: used to indicate that the person named is proprietor or laird of the place named: Moncrieff of that ilk
Usage note
Although the use of ilk in the sense of sense 1 is sometimes condemned as being the result of a misunderstanding of the original Scottish expression of that ilk, it is nevertheless well established and generally acceptable
Word Origin
Old English ilca the same family, same kind; related to Gothic is he, Latin is, Old English gelīc like

ilk2

/ɪlk/
determiner
1.
(Scot) each; every
Word Origin
Old English ǣlc each (+ a1)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ilk
adj.

Old English ilca "same" (n. and adj.), from Proto-Germanic *ij-lik, in which the first element is from the PIE demonstrative particle *i- (see yon) and the second is that in Old English -lic "form" (see like). Of similar formation are which and such. Phrase of that ilk implies coincidence of name and estate, as in Lundie of Lundie; applied usually to families, so by c.1790 it began to be used with meaning "family," then broadening to "type, sort."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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