illusory

[ih-loo-suh-ree, -zuh-]
adjective
1.
causing illusion; deceptive; misleading.
2.
of the nature of an illusion; unreal.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Late Latin illūsōrius, equivalent to illūd(ere) to mock, ridicule (see illusion) + -tōrius -tory1

illusorily, adverb
illusoriness, noun
unillusory, adjective

elusive, illusory.


1. fallacious, specious, false. 2. imaginary; visionary, fancied.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
illusory or illusive (ɪˈluːsərɪ, ɪˈluːsɪv)
 
adj
producing, produced by, or based on illusion; deceptive or unreal
 
usage  Illusive is sometimes wrongly used where elusive is meant: they fought hard, but victory remained elusive (not illusive)
 
illusive or illusive
 
adj
 
usage  Illusive is sometimes wrongly used where elusive is meant: they fought hard, but victory remained elusive (not illusive)
 
il'lusorily or illusive
 
adv
 
il'lusively or illusive
 
adv
 
il'lusoriness or illusive
 
n
 
il'lusiveness or illusive
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

illusory
1590s, from Fr. illusorie, from L.L. illusorius "of a mocking character," from L. illudere "mock at," lit. "to play with," from in- "at" + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
GM foods are not made to solve an illusory food shortage.
Yet it needs but a moment's reflection to convince us that this naturalness of
  speech is but an illusory feeling.
Against the scale of the rebellion, these were illusory accomplishments.
And although the situation appears to change, the change is illusory.
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