imitation

[im-i-tey-shuhn]
noun
1.
a result or product of imitating.
2.
the act of imitating.
3.
a counterfeit; copy.
4.
a literary composition that imitates the manner or subject of another author or work.
5.
Biology, mimicry.
6.
Psychology. the performance of an act whose stimulus is the observation of the act performed by another person.
7.
Sociology. the copying of patterns of activity and thought of other groups or individuals.
8.
Art.
a.
(in Aristotelian aesthetics) the representation of an object or an action as it ought to be.
b.
the representation of actuality in art or literature.
9.
Music. the repetition of a melodic phrase at a different pitch or key from the original or in a different voice part.
adjective
10.
designed to imitate a genuine or superior article or thing: imitation leather.
11.
Jewelry. noting an artificial gem no part of which is of the true gemstone. Compare assembled, synthetic ( def 5 ).

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin imitātiōn- (stem of imitātiō). See imitate, -ion

imitational, adjective
nonimitational, adjective
overimitation, noun
preimitation, noun
self-imitation, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
imitation (ˌɪmɪˈteɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act, practice, or art of imitating; mimicry
2.  an instance or product of imitating, such as a copy of the manner of a person; impression
3.  a.  a copy or reproduction of a genuine article; counterfeit
 b.  (as modifier): imitation jewellery
4.  (in contrapuntal or polyphonic music) the repetition of a phrase or figure in one part after its appearance in another, as in a fugue
5.  a literary composition that adapts the style of an older work to the writer's own purposes
 
imi'tational
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

imitation
c.1500, from O.Fr. imitacion, from L. imitationem (nom. imitatio) "imitation," from imitari "to copy, portray, imitate," from PIE *im-eto-, from base *aim- "copy." (Related to L. imago, see image). The verb imitate is first recorded 1530s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

imitation

in psychology, the reproduction or performance of an act that is stimulated by the perception of a similar act by another animal or person. Essentially, it involves a model to which the attention and response of the imitator are directed

Learn more about imitation with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
But imitation facing brick, sold at home centers, looks almost exactly the same
  and is easily applied.
For any scholar contemplating an imitation of my method, choose a group or
  subject you find essentially repulsive.
Zircons are heavy, durable minerals related to the synthetic cubic zirconium
  used for imitation diamonds and costume jewelry.
Imitation is thought to be the sincerest form of flattery-even when the mimic
  and model are unaware of the mimicry.
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