impair

[im-pair]
verb (used with object)
1.
to make or cause to become worse; diminish in ability, value, excellence, etc.; weaken or damage: to impair one's health; to impair negotiations.
verb (used without object)
2.
to grow or become worse; lessen.
noun
3.
Archaic. impairment.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English empairen, empeiren to make worse < Middle French empeirer, equivalent to em- im-1 + peirer to make worse < Late Latin pējōrāre, equivalent to Latin pējōr-, stem of pējor worse + -ā- thematic vowel + -re infinitive suffix; cf. pejorative

impairable, adjective
impairer, noun
impairment, noun
nonimpairment, noun
preimpairment, noun
self-impairable, adjective
self-impairing, adjective
unimpairable, adjective


1. See injure.


1. repair.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

impair

[an-per]
adjective French.
noting any odd number, especially in roulette.
Compare pair.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To impair
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World English Dictionary
impair (ɪmˈpɛə)
 
vb
(tr) to reduce or weaken in strength, quality, etc: his hearing was impaired by an accident
 
[C14: from Old French empeirer to make worse, from Late Latin pējorāre, from Latin pejor worse; see pejorative]
 
im'pairable
 
adj
 
im'pairer
 
n
 
im'pairment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

impair
late 14c., earlier ampayre, apeyre (c.1300), from O.Fr. empeirier, from V.L. *impejorare "make worse," from L. in- "into" + L.L. pejorare "make worse," from pejor "worse." In ref. to driving under the influence of alcohol, first recorded 1951 in Canadian Eng.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Foot problems can also impair balance and function in this age group.
Alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine impair decision-making skills.
But this cannot impair respect for his broader judgment: historians will always
  be arguing.
Low levels can impair physical and mental development.
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