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impeccable

[im-pek-uh-buh l] /ɪmˈpɛk ə bəl/
adjective
1.
faultless; flawless; irreproachable:
impeccable manners.
2.
not liable to sin; incapable of sin.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; < Latin impeccābilis faultless, sinless. See im-2, peccable
Related forms
impeccability, noun
impeccably, adverb
Synonyms
1. unassailable, unexceptionable.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for impeccably
  • We all behaved impeccably and did extremely well at school.
  • Despite the appearance of the rest of the building, her apartment was impeccably clean and orderly.
  • The crowd in this stylish old resort dresses impeccably well.
  • Exquisitely detailed and impeccably preserved, this golden ram once crowned a nomad's headdress.
  • They are all hallowed places, somber and impeccably maintained.
  • He wore impeccably tailored tweed suits and sometimes a monocle.
  • Many of the original altarpieces, structures, and art are impeccably maintained.
  • It is impeccably looked after and the arrangements for tourists are excellent.
  • Out slide two neat rows of chipmunks, impeccably preserved.
  • He was tall and trim and impeccably dressed, his suits well-pressed and invariably accented with suspenders and florid bow ties.
British Dictionary definitions for impeccably

impeccable

/ɪmˈpɛkəbəl/
adjective
1.
without flaw or error; faultless: an impeccable record
2.
(rare) incapable of sinning
Derived Forms
impeccability, noun
impeccably, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Late Latin impeccābilis sinless, from Latin im- (not) + peccāre to sin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for impeccably

impeccable

adj.

1530s, "not capable of sin," from Middle French impeccable (15c.) or directly from Late Latin impeccabilis "not liable to sin," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + pecare "to sin," of unknown origin. Meaning "faultless" is from 1610s. Related: Impeccably.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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