impersonate

[v. im-pur-suh-neyt; adj. im-pur-suh-nit, -neyt]
verb (used with object), impersonated, impersonating.
1.
to assume the character or appearance of; pretend to be: He was arrested for impersonating a police officer.
2.
to mimic the voice, mannerisms, etc., of (a person) in order to entertain.
3.
to act or play the part of; personate.
4.
Archaic. to represent in personal or bodily form; personify; typify.
adjective
5.
embodied in a person; invested with personality.

Origin:
1615–25; im-1 + person + -ate1

impersonation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
impersonate (ɪmˈpɜːsəˌneɪt)
 
vb
1.  to pretend to be (another person)
2.  to imitate the character, mannerisms, etc, of (another person)
3.  rare to play the part or character of
4.  an archaic word for personify
 
imperson'ation
 
n
 
im'personator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

impersonate
1624, "to invest with a personality," from L. in- "in" + persona "person." Sense of "to assume the person or character of" is first recorded 1715. Impersonator in this sense is from 1853.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The mimic octopus can impersonate lots of underwater creatures, including
  flatfish.
Otherwise periodically impersonate cleaning wars to prevent population growing
  worldwide.
On the bench he may in fact impersonate a mummy swathed in double-knit.
Language is a playing with words until they can impersonate physical objects
  and abstract ideas.
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