implacable

[im-plak-uh-buhl, -pley-kuh-]
adjective
not to be appeased, mollified, or pacified; inexorable: an implacable enemy.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin implācābilis. See im-2, placable

implacability, implacableness, noun
implacably, adverb


unappeasable, unbending, merciless. See inflexible.
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World English Dictionary
implacable (ɪmˈplækəbəl)
 
adj
1.  incapable of being placated or pacified; unappeasable
2.  inflexible; intractable
 
implaca'bility
 
n
 
im'placableness
 
n
 
im'placably
 
adv

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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  implacable
Part of Speech:  adj
Definition:  unable to be appeased; irreconcilable
Etymology:  Latin im- + placare 'to appease'
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

implacable
1522, from O.Fr. implacable, from L. implacabilis "unappeasable," from in- "not" + placabilis "easily appeased" (see placate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
At this point and this was where his cruel, implacable nature showed itself the
  past ceased to exist for him.
His good efforts were met with implacable ideological warfare and will to power
  from the other side.
In the face of the implacable evil witnessed this week, the answer may have
  changed.
There is only the implacable queue of tickets, coded with a variety of letters.
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