impolite

[im-puh-lahyt]
adjective
not polite or courteous; discourteous; rude: an impolite reply.

Origin:
1605–15; < Latin impolītus rough, unpolished. See im-2, polite

impolitely, adverb
impoliteness, noun


disrespectful; uncivil; insolent; boorish, ill-mannered, rough.
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World English Dictionary
impolite (ˌɪmpəˈlaɪt)
 
adj
discourteous; rude; uncivil
 
impo'litely
 
adv
 
impo'liteness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

impolite
1612, "unrefined, rough," from L. impolitus, from in- "not" + politus "polished" (see polite). Sense of "discourteous, ill-mannered" is from 1739.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
When he does turn it on, the excess hydrogen vents from a small pipe on the
  roof with the sound of an impolite burp.
It is not impolite to ignore these people, to tell them to go away or to even
  display anger if they cross the line and touch you.
It may be impolite to not send our thank yous for social occasions, but not
  employment situations.
Even the word lady when used this way is impolite and inappropriate.
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