impost

1 [im-pohst]
noun
1.
a tax; tribute; duty.
2.
a customs duty.
3.
Horse Racing. the weight assigned to a horse in a race.
verb (used with object)
4.
to determine customs duties on, according to the kind of imports.

Origin:
1560–70; < Medieval Latin impostus a tax, noun use of Latin impostus, variant of impositus imposed; see imposition

imposter, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

impostor

[im-pos-ter]
noun
a person who practices deception under an assumed character, identity, or name.
Also, imposter.


Origin:
1580–90; < Late Latin, equivalent to Latin impos(i)-, variant stem of impōnere to deceive, place on (see impone) + -tor -tor

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
impost1 (ˈɪmpəʊst)
 
n
1.  a tax, esp a customs duty
2.  horse racing the specific weight that a particular horse must carry in a handicap race
 
vb
3.  (US) (tr) to classify (imported goods) according to the duty payable on them
 
[C16: from Medieval Latin impostus tax, from Latin impositus imposed; see impose]
 
'imposter1
 
n

impost2 (ˈɪmpəʊst)
 
n
architect a member at the top of a wall, pier, or column that supports an arch, esp one that has a projecting moulding
 
[C17: from French imposte, from Latin impositus placed upon; see impose]

impostor or imposter (ɪmˈpɒstə)
 
n
a person who deceives others, esp by assuming a false identity; charlatan
 
[C16: from Late Latin: deceiver; see impose]
 
imposter or imposter
 
n
 
[C16: from Late Latin: deceiver; see impose]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

impostor
1586, from M.Fr. imposteur, from L.L. impostorem (nom. impostor), agent noun from impostus, collateral form of impositus, pp. of imponere "place upon, impose upon, deceive," from in- "in" + ponere "to put place" (see position). Imposture "act of willfully deceiving others" first recorded 1537.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He then saves the queen's imposter from the dungeon.
One of the funniest moments in the production is achieved in her initial encounter with that imposter.
And all of the times genuine posters are complaining that everything posted by the imposter is inaccurate.
At any one of those moments you could have been replaced by an imposter.
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