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imprecate

[im-pri-keyt] /ˈɪm prɪˌkeɪt/
verb (used with object), imprecated, imprecating.
1.
to invoke or call down (evil or curses), as upon a person.
Origin
1605-1615
1605-15; < Latin imprecātus past participle of imprecārī to invoke, pray to or for, equivalent to im- im-1 + prec- pray + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
imprecator, noun
imprecatory, adjective
unimprecated, adjective
Synonyms
curse, execrate, anathematize, accurse, denunciate.
Antonyms
bless.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for imprecate

imprecate

/ˈɪmprɪˌkeɪt/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to swear, curse, or blaspheme
2.
(transitive) to invoke or bring down (evil, a curse, etc) to imprecate disaster on the ship
3.
(transitive) to put a curse on
Derived Forms
imprecatory, adjective
Word Origin
C17: from Latin imprecārī to invoke, from im-in-² + precārī to pray
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for imprecate
v.

1610s, probably a back-formation from imprecation. Related: Imprecated; imprecating; imprecatory (1580s).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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