impugn

[im-pyoon]
verb (used with object)
1.
to challenge as false (another's statements, motives, etc.); cast doubt upon.
2.
Archaic. to assail (a person) by words or arguments; vilify.
3.
Obsolete. to attack (a person) physically.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English impugnen < Middle French impugner < Latin impugnāre to attack, equivalent to im- im-1 + pugnāre to fight, derivative of pugnus fist; see pugnacious

impugnable, adjective
impugnability, noun
impugner, noun
impugnment, noun
unimpugnable, adjective
unimpugned, adjective

impugn, impute.


1. attack, asperse, malign, criticize, censure.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
impugn (ɪmˈpjuːn)
 
vb
(tr) to challenge or attack as false; assail; criticize
 
[C14: from Old French impugner, from Latin impugnāre to fight against, attack, from im- + pugnāre to fight]
 
im'pugnable
 
adj
 
impugnation
 
n
 
im'pugnment
 
n
 
im'pugner
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

impugn
mid-14c., from O.Fr. impugner, from L. impugnare "to assault, to attack," from in- "upon" + pugnare "to fight" (see pugnacious).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
These findings are not meant to impugn your character.
Probation officers shall not impugn the decisions and directives of the court.
He didn't believe anyone took the time to impugn anyone's integrity.
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