inane

[ih-neyn]
adjective
1.
lacking sense, significance, or ideas; silly: inane questions.
2.
empty; void.
noun
3.
something that is empty or void, especially the void of infinite space.

Origin:
1655–65; < Latin inānis

inanely, adverb


1. pointless. See foolish.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
inane (ɪˈneɪn)
 
adj
senseless, unimaginative, or empty; unintelligent: inane remarks
 
[C17: from Latin inānis empty]
 
in'anely
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inane
"silly, empty-headed," 1819, earlier "empty" (1660s), a back-formation of inanity "emptiness, hollowness" (c.1600), later "silliness" (1753), from Fr. inanité, from L. inanitatem "emptiness," from inanis "empty, void, worthless, useless." Inanition is attested from c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
All the special effects in the world would not have made up for the inane plot and forced acting.
They are typically stale from overuse, usually wordy, often vague and occasionally inane.
For example, electronic media relay all kinds of information: valuable as well as inane, reliable as well as unsubstantiated.
Most of management theory is inane, writes our correspondent, the founder of a
  consulting firm.
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