inception

[in-sep-shuhn]
noun
1.
beginning; start; commencement.
2.
British.
a.
the act of graduating or earning a university degree, usually a master's or doctor's degree, especially at Cambridge University.
b.
the graduation ceremony; commencement.
3.
(in science fiction) the act of instilling an idea into someone's mind by entering his or her dreams.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English incepcion < Latin inceptiōn- (stem of inceptiō), equivalent to incept(us) begun (see incept) + -iōn- -ion

concept, conception, inception.


1. origin, outset, source, root, conception.
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World English Dictionary
inception (ɪnˈsɛpʃən)
 
n
the beginning, as of a project or undertaking

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inception
late 15c., from L. inceptionem (nom. inceptio), from inceptus, pp. of incipere "begin, take in hand," from in- "in, on" + cipere comb. form of capere "take, seize" (see capable).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Celebrities have walked the gallery's halls from its inception.
Roger was being a bit hyperbolic when he claimed to have entered practically
  all of the contests since its inception.
It is the inherent right of the new life to have its inception in such physical
  ground, in such spiritual atmosphere.
Since the inception of the national marine park, the recovery is simply
  astounding.
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