indict

[in-dahyt]
verb (used with object)
1.
(of a grand jury) to bring a formal accusation against, as a means of bringing to trial: The grand jury indicted him for murder.
2.
to charge with an offense or crime; accuse of wrongdoing; castigate; criticize: He tends to indict everyone of plotting against him.

Origin:
1620–30; variant spelling (< Medieval Latin) of indite

indictee, noun
indicter, indictor, noun
reindict, verb (used with object)
unindicted, adjective

indict, indite.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
indict (ɪnˈdaɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to charge (a person) with crime, esp formally in writing; accuse
 
[C14: alteration of enditen to indite]
 
 
indict'ee
 
n
 
in'dicter
 
n
 
in'dictor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

indict
c.1300, from Anglo-Fr. enditer "accuse, indict" (1278), from O.Fr. enditer "to dictate or inform," from M.L. indictare "to declare, proclaim in writing," from L. in- "in" + dictare "to say, compose in words" (see dictate). Retained its Fr. pronunciation even after the spelling
was re-Latinized c.1600.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
For generations, arson inspectors have used outmoded theories to help indict and incarcerate many suspects.
Seriously off topic but to try to indict all the folks you listed for treason is a joke.
Their decision to investigate or indict can bankrupt a business or destroy a life.
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