indiscreet

[in-di-skreet]
adjective
not discreet; lacking prudence, good judgment, or circumspection: an indiscreet remark.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English indiscret (probably < Middle French) < Latin indiscrētus undivided; see indiscrete

indiscreetly, adverb
indiscreetness, noun

indiscreet, indiscrete.


imprudent, incautious, impolitic.
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World English Dictionary
indiscreet (ˌɪndɪˈskriːt)
 
adj
not discreet; imprudent or tactless
 
indis'creetly
 
adv
 
indis'creetness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

indiscreet
"imprudent, not discrete" (early 15c.) and indiscrete "not containing distinct parts" (c.1600) are both from L. indiscretus "unseparated;" the former via an O.Fr. or M.L. secondary sense. Indiscretion as a euphemism for "immoral act" is from c.1600.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
In general he's indiscreet with salt, though you never know.
Much of this book contains previously unheard and highly indiscreet quotations.
Indiscreet old partners will be eager to tell the writer how it really was in
  the early days.
The indiscreet fertilizer subsidy damaged the farms and politics both.
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