innovation

[in-uh-vey-shuhn]
noun
1.
something new or different introduced: numerous innovations in the high-school curriculum.
2.
the act of innovating; introduction of new things or methods.

Origin:
1540–50; < Late Latin innovātiōn- (stem of innovātiō). See innovate, -ion

innovational, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To innovation
Collins
World English Dictionary
innovation (ˌɪnəˈveɪʃən)
 
n
1.  something newly introduced, such as a new method or device
2.  the act of innovating
 
inno'vational
 
adj
 
inno'vationist
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

innovation
1540s, from L. innovationem, noun of action from innovare (see innovate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
It seems that climate change is not only a driver of evolutionary innovation,
  of evolutionary adaptations.
When people want to change, they usually turn first to the strategy of
  innovation.
The rapidly shifting landscape makes it tough to keep up with change and
  innovation, let alone stay ahead of the curve.
Everywhere the nomads destroyed much, but everywhere they brought in a new
  spirit of free enquiry and moral innovation.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature