innovate

[in-uh-veyt]
verb (used without object), innovated, innovating.
1.
to introduce something new; make changes in anything established.
verb (used with object), innovated, innovating.
2.
to introduce (something new) for or as if for the first time: to innovate a computer operating system.
3.
Archaic. to alter.

Origin:
1540–50; < Latin innovātus past participle of innovāre to renew, alter, equivalent to in- in-2 + novātus (novā(re) to renew, verbal derivative of novus new + -tus past participle suffix)

innovator, noun
innovatory, adjective
uninnovating, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
innovate (ˈɪnəˌveɪt)
 
vb
to invent or begin to apply (methods, ideas, etc)
 
[C16: from Latin innovāre to renew, from in-² + novāre to make new, from novus new]
 
innovative
 
adj
 
'innovatory
 
adj
 
'innovator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

innovate
1548, from L. innovatus, pp. of innovare "to renew or change," from in- "into" + novus "new."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But those ideas are often rejected because the creative innovator must stand up
  to vested interests and defy the crowd.
Clearly, it is not enough to have an innovative strategy, one must also be an
  innovator in one's choice of words.
Historians have viewed her both as a brazen usurper and a gender-bending
  innovator.
It has become a leading industrial power, a technological innovator and a
  vibrant democracy.
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