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inspire

[in-spahyuh r] /ɪnˈspaɪər/
verb (used with object), inspired, inspiring.
1.
to fill with an animating, quickening, or exalting influence:
His courage inspired his followers.
2.
to produce or arouse (a feeling, thought, etc.):
to inspire confidence in others.
3.
to fill or affect with a specified feeling, thought, etc.:
to inspire a person with distrust.
4.
to influence or impel:
Competition inspired her to greater efforts.
5.
to animate, as an influence, feeling, thought, or the like, does:
They were inspired by a belief in a better future.
6.
to communicate or suggest by a divine or supernatural influence:
writings inspired by God.
7.
to guide or control by divine influence.
8.
to prompt or instigate (utterances, acts, etc.) by influence, without avowal of responsibility.
9.
to give rise to, bring about, cause, etc.:
a philosophy that inspired a revolution.
10.
to take (air, gases, etc.) into the lungs in breathing; inhale.
11.
Archaic.
  1. to infuse (breath, life, etc.) by breathing (usually followed by into).
  2. to breathe into or upon.
verb (used without object), inspired, inspiring.
12.
to give inspiration.
13.
to inhale.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English inspiren < Latin inspīrāre to breathe upon or into, equivalent to in- in-2 + spīrāre to breathe
Related forms
inspirative
[in-spahyuh r-uh-tiv, in-spi-rey-tiv] /ɪnˈspaɪər ə tɪv, ˈɪn spɪˌreɪ tɪv/ (Show IPA),
adjective
inspirer, noun
inspiringly, adverb
preinspire, verb (used with object), preinspired, preinspiring.
pseudoinspiring, adjective
reinspire, verb, reinspired, reinspiring.
uninspiring, adjective
uninspiringly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for inspiring
  • Anna had a rich life and has left an inspiring legacy.
  • These individuals are inspiring and encouraging a new generation of business professionals.
  • Her determined goal each year is to ensure a fair, fun, and inspiring experience for the geographic students.
  • People have long blamed the moon for inspiring strange behavior in humans.
  • Herbicide chemistry may not sound particularly inspiring.
  • inspiring them to know there is no limit to what can be, is one of my primary messages.
  • However, not all daydreams are equally effective at inspiring new ideas.
  • Indeed the framework comes packaged in some inspiring language.
  • But the finishing lines are as artificial as they are inspiring.
  • Take a look at some of the entries-it's both humbling and inspiring to see what these students are capable of doing.
British Dictionary definitions for inspiring

inspire

/ɪnˈspaɪə/
verb
1.
to exert a stimulating or beneficial effect upon (a person); animate or invigorate
2.
(transitive; foll by with or to; may take an infinitive) to arouse (with a particular emotion or to a particular action); stir
3.
(transitive) to prompt or instigate; give rise to her beauty inspired his love
4.
(transitive; often passive) to guide or arouse by divine influence or inspiration
5.
to take or draw (air, gas, etc) into the lungs; inhale
6.
(transitive) (archaic)
  1. to breathe into or upon
  2. to breathe life into
Derived Forms
inspirable, adjective
inspirative, adjective
inspirer, noun
inspiringly, adverb
Word Origin
C14 (in the sense: to breathe upon, blow into): from Latin inspīrāre, from spīrāre to breathe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inspiring

inspire

v.

mid-14c., enspiren, "to fill (the mind, heart, etc., with grace, etc.);" also "to prompt or induce (someone to do something)," from Old French enspirer (13c.), from Latin inspirare "inflame; blow into" (see inspiration), a loan-translation of Greek pnein in the Bible. General sense of "influence or animate with an idea or purpose" is from late 14c. Also sometimes used in literal sense in Middle English Related: Inspired; inspires; inspiring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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inspiring in Medicine

inspire in·spire (ĭn-spīr')
v. in·spired, in·spir·ing, in·spires
To draw in breath; to inhale.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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