instigation

[in-sti-gey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of instigating; incitement.
2.
an incentive.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin instīgātiōn- (stem of instīgātiō). See instigate, ion

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To instigation
Collins
World English Dictionary
instigate (ˈɪnstɪˌɡeɪt)
 
vb
1.  to bring about, as by incitement or urging: to instigate rebellion
2.  to urge on to some drastic or inadvisable action
 
[C16: from Latin instīgāre to stimulate, incite; compare Greek stizein to prick]
 
'instigatingly
 
adv
 
insti'gation
 
n
 
'instigative
 
adj
 
'instigator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

instigation
early 15c., from L. instigationem (nom. instigatio), noun of action from instigare "urge on, incite," from in- "in" + *stigare, a root meaning "to prick," from PIE base *steig- "to prick, stick, pierce."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
The immediate instigation was to help manage an ungodly surge in spam.
The last great burst of creativity came in the early sixties, again at the
  instigation of a foreigner.
His often dry-humored, wise-guy perspective was a source of humor and
  instigation.
Children of politicians are not running for office, and their presence on stage
  is at the instigation of the parents.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;