interception

[in-ter-sep-shuhn]
noun
1.
an act or instance of intercepting.
2.
the state or fact of being intercepted.
3.
Military.
a.
the engaging of an enemy force in an attempt to hinder or prevent it from carrying out its mission.
b.
the monitoring of enemy radio transmission to obtain information.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Latin interceptiōn- (stem of interceptiō). See intercept, -ion

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
intercept
 
vb
1.  to stop, deflect, or seize on the way from one place to another; prevent from arriving or proceeding
2.  sport to seize or cut off (a pass) on its way from one opponent to another
3.  maths to cut off, mark off, or bound (some part of a line, curve, plane, or surface)
 
n
4.  maths
 a.  a point at which two figures intersect
 b.  the distance from the origin to the point at which a line, curve, or surface cuts a coordinate axis
 c.  an intercepted segment
5.  (US), (Canadian) sport the act of intercepting an opponent's pass
 
[C16: from Latin intercipere to seize before arrival, from inter- + capere to take]
 
inter'ception
 
n
 
inter'ceptive
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
Interception and divulgence of radio communications is governed by many
  jurisdictions, including federal and state.
The suppressed psychic impulse remains strong enough to revenge itself, by
  discontent and interception, on the suppressing agency.
It creates myriad opportunities for sabotage or interception by bad actors.
Tipu had taken up position at a strategic moment, engineering the interception.
Images for interception
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