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interfere

[in-ter-feer] /ˌɪn tərˈfɪər/
verb (used without object), interfered, interfering.
1.
to come into opposition, as one thing with another, especially with the effect of hampering action or procedure (often followed by with):
Constant distractions interfere with work.
2.
to take part in the affairs of others; meddle (often followed by with or in):
to interfere in another's life.
3.
(of things) to strike against each other, or one against another, so as to hamper or hinder action; come into physical collision.
4.
to interpose or intervene for a particular purpose.
5.
to strike one foot or leg against another in moving, as a horse.
6.
Sports.
  1. to obstruct the action of an opposing player in a way barred by the rules.
  2. Football. to run interference for a teammate carrying the ball.
7.
Physics. to cause interference.
8.
to clash; come in collision; be in opposition:
The claims of two nations may interfere.
9.
Law. to claim earlier invention when several patent requests for the same invention are being filed.
Verb phrases
10.
interfere with, Chiefly British. to molest sexually.
Origin
1520-1530
1520-30; inter- + -fere < Latin ferīre to strike; modeled on Middle French s'entreferir
Related forms
interferer, noun
interferingly, adverb
noninterfering, adjective
noninterferingly, adverb
Synonyms
2. pry, intrude, encroach, interlope. 4. intercede.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for interfere
  • They're quick enough to not interfere with your regular sleep pattern or make you feel groggy afterwards.
  • It was a beautiful day, good for pictures and video, but windy enough to interfere with audio recording.
  • They're also in a confined environment, so any competing odors are going to interfere with their ability to smell the food.
  • What was true then is true now: the vaccine has never been shown to interfere with the mental development of children.
  • In the past, people who recognized me didn't interfere with my privacy.
  • Cell-phone use was being curtailed so as not to interfere with emergency communications.
  • They interfere with fish migration and habitat for other wildlife by reducing water flow.
  • The expedition team did not interfere with the remains, taking only photographs.
  • Text must be placed so that it is readable and easily located but also must not interfere with the map's data or design.
  • Stress can interfere with the brain's cognitive processes.
British Dictionary definitions for interfere

interfere

/ˌɪntəˈfɪə/
verb (intransitive)
1.
(often foll by in) to interpose, esp meddlesomely or unwarrantedly; intervene
2.
(often foll by with) to come between or in opposition; hinder; obstruct
3.
(foll by with) (euphemistic) to assault sexually
4.
to strike one against the other, as a horse's legs
5.
(physics) to cause or produce interference
Derived Forms
interferer, noun
interfering, adjective
interferingly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Old French s'entreferir to collide, from entre-inter- + ferir to strike, from Latin ferīre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for interfere
interfere
1440, "to strike against," from M.Fr. enterferer "to strike each other," from entre- "between" + ferir "to strike," from L. ferire "to knock, strike," related to L. forare "to bore, pierce," and cognate with O.E. borian "to bore" (cf. punch (v.), which has both the sense "to hit" and "to make a hole in"). Fig. sense of "to meddle with, oppose unrightfully" is from 1632.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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