invidious

[in-vid-ee-uhs]
adjective
1.
calculated to create ill will or resentment or give offense; hateful: invidious remarks.
2.
offensively or unfairly discriminating; injurious: invidious comparisons.
3.
causing or tending to cause animosity, resentment, or envy: an invidious honor.
4.
Obsolete, envious.

Origin:
1600–10; < Latin invidiōsus envious, envied, hateful, equivalent to invidi(a) envy + -ōsus -ous

invidiously, adverb
invidiousness, noun
noninvidious, adjective
noninvidiously, adverb
noninvidiousness, noun
uninvidious, adjective
uninvidiously, adverb

insidious, invidious.
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World English Dictionary
invidious (ɪnˈvɪdɪəs)
 
adj
1.  incurring or tending to arouse resentment, unpopularity, etc: an invidious task
2.  (of comparisons or distinctions) unfairly or offensively discriminating
3.  obsolete grudging; envious
 
[C17: from Latin invidiōsus full of envy, from invidiaenvy]
 
in'vidiously
 
adv
 
in'vidiousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

invidious
c.1600, from L. invidiosus "envious," from invidia "ill will" (see envy).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It might be that in this case an absence of invidious commentary suggests an absence of invidious feeling.
The precise question is whether the difference in treatment is invidious or arbitrary.
The provisions in controversy are rationally based and free from invidious discrimination.
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