ironic

[ahy-ron-ik]
adjective
1.
using words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning; containing or exemplifying irony: an ironic novel; an ironic remark.
2.
of, pertaining to, or tending to use irony or mockery; ironical.
3.
coincidental; unexpected: It was ironic that I was seated next to my ex-husband at the dinner.

Origin:
1620–30; < Late Latin īrōnicus < Greek eirōnikós dissembling, insincere. See irony, -ic

nonironic, adjective
semi-ironic, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
ironic or ironical (aɪˈrɒnɪk)
 
adj
of, characterized by, or using irony
 
ironical or ironical
 
adj
 
i'ronicalness or ironical
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ironic
1620s, from L. ironicus, from Gk. eironikos, from eironeia (see irony).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
As a consequence of this condition ironic expressions are particularly subject
  to the danger of being misunderstood.
Some cats are cold and haughty, imperious and ironic.
The ironic part is the struggle he had to go though to prove his worth.
Ironic that in some ways his fans feel he is somewhat unappreciated.
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