Iroquois

[ir-uh-kwoi, -kwoiz]
noun, plural Iroquois.
1.
a member of a North American Indian confederacy, the Five Nations, comprising the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas, and later the Tuscaroras.
adjective
2.
belonging or relating to the iroquois or their tribes.

Origin:
1660–70, Americanism; < French: adaptation of an unidentified term in an Algonquian language

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To iroquois
Collins
World English Dictionary
Iroquois (ˈɪrəˌkwɔɪ, -ˌkwɔɪz)
 
n , pl -quois
1.  Five Nations See also Six Nations a member of any of a group of North American Indian peoples formerly living between the Hudson River and the St Lawrence and Lake Erie
2.  any of the Iroquoian languages
 
adj
3.  of or relating to the Iroquois, their language, or their culture

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Iroquois
1666, from Fr. (1603); not an Iroquoian word; perhaps from an Algonquian language.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences for iroquois
The abenaki also built long houses similar to those of the iroquois.
Eventually, the tribes moved north under the protection of the iroquois.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature