iteration

[it-uh-rey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of repeating; a repetition.
2.
Mathematics.
a.
Also called successive approximation. a problem-solving or computational method in which a succession of approximations, each building on the one preceding, is used to achieve a desired degree of accuracy.
b.
an instance of the use of this method.
3.
Computers.
a.
a repetition of a statement or statements in a program.
b.
a different version of an existing data set, software program, hardware device, etc.: A new iteration of the data will be released next month.
4.
a different form or version of something: He designed the previous iteration of our logo.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English < Latin iterātiōn-, stem of iterātiō; see iterate, -ion

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
iterate (ˈɪtəˌreɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to say or do again; repeat
 
[C16: from Latin iterāre, from iterum again]
 
'iterant
 
adj
 
iter'ation
 
n
 
'iterance
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

iteration definition

programming
Repetition of a sequence of instructions. A fundamental part of many algorithms. Iteration is characterised by a set of initial conditions, an iterative step and a termination condition.
A well known example of iteration in mathematics is Newton-Raphson iteration. Iteration in programs is expressed using loops, e.g. in C:
new_x = n/2; do x = new_x; new_x = 0.5 * (x + n/x); while (abs(new_x-x) > epsilon);
Iteration can be expressed in functional languages using recursion:
solve x n = if abs(new_x-x) > epsilon then solve new_x n else new_x where new_x = 0.5 * (x + n/x)
solve n/2 n
(1998-04-04)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
The current iteration of supermarkets is in reality a bit of a pox upon our
  house.
But you don't need to see every iteration to know that it is happening anyway.
The latter iteration came to be known as the stein, though the two seem to be
  used interchangeably.
If the algorithms were successful at moving the robots closer to a target,
  they'd be used in the next iteration.
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