follow Dictionary.com

Get the details behind our redesign

jeopardize

[jep-er-dahyz] /ˈdʒɛp ərˌdaɪz/
verb (used with object), jeopardized, jeopardizing.
1.
to put in jeopardy; hazard; risk; imperil:
He jeopardized his life every time he dived from the tower.
Also, especially British, jeopardise.
Origin
1640-1650
1640-50; jeopard(y) + -ize
Related forms
rejeopardize, verb (used with object), rejeopardized, rejeopardizing.
unjeopardized, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for jeopardize
  • By being forced to live hand to mouth, people naturally will become fearful of any change that might jeopardize the status quo.
  • Left unchecked, a bacteria buildup could jeopardize space missions.
  • But obtaining a sufficient number of stem cells from a donor cornea can jeopardize it.
  • It might also jeopardize your ability to get insurance.
  • She hoped this fact wouldn't jeopardize my interest in the job offer, but her hands were tied.
  • He's punting, because he knows to do otherwise would jeopardize his second term.
  • However, a coal company plans to mine near the property, which would jeopardize the farm's water supply.
  • But wouldn't want to jeopardize a potable water stratum.
  • But this kind of familiarity can jeopardize a business.
  • College leaders can also jeopardize their credibility if they understate problems.
British Dictionary definitions for jeopardize

jeopardize

/ˈdʒɛpəˌdaɪz/
verb (transitive)
1.
to risk; hazard he jeopardized his job by being persistently unpunctual
2.
to put in danger; imperil
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for jeopardize

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for jeopardize

29
0
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with jeopardize